Thursday, January 31, 2013

All Praise the Domestic Bar

My earliest childhood memories of my father involve him standing behind the wet bar, serving drinks.  As a child it seemed like a fun mini-kitchen environment (sink, glasses, small fridge) that was activated for entertaining. Wet bars are not often feasible in smaller houses or apartments, as they require a sink and ideally, a refrigerator and ice-maker. Bar trays, however, are an excellent, and perhaps more welcoming solution for those in small quarters — they are out in the open and the bar contents take on a tableau of their own.  What I love about home bars is the suggestion that a party is about to erupt at any moment. Even the smallest studio apartment can fit a pocket-sized bar. A studio apartment with a bookshelf, record player and a bar tray is, in my book, infinitely more complete than something bigger and less welcoming.

The quintessential David Hicks bar table.

The quintessential David Hicks bar table.

 

Again, Miles Redd's symmetry and color wins the welcoming wet bar game.

Miles Redd’s symmetry and color wins the welcoming bar table game.

Bunny Williams' wet bar.

Bunny Williams’ wet bar.

Miles Redd is the contemporary designer responsible for the most luscious bar trays and wet bars.

Miles Redd is the contemporary designer responsible for the most luscious bar trays and wet bars.

Terence Conran's 1974 edition of The House Book features a bar hidden inside a bookshelf panel.

Terence Conran’s 1974 edition of The House Book features a bar hidden inside a bookshelf panel.

The English designer David Hicks perfected the welcoming bar table ensemble.

The English designer David Hicks perfected the welcoming bar table ensemble.

Rita Konig's sweet, unfussy wet bar, as featured on The Selby.

Rita Konig’s sweet, unfussy wet bar, as featured on The Selby.

 

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